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Sholden Church 1918, Deal

Sholden Church 1918, Deal
 
 

Sholden Church 1918, Deal Ref: 68503

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Memories of Sholden Church 1918, Deal

Sholden Kent Near Deal Kent. 1810-91 Norris Marsh & Berwick Family

Sholden Church 1918, Deal
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George James Norris and his wife Charlotte, nee Halliday, lived at Alders, Sholden with their 5 children in 1891.

Miss Sarah Norrice who was living with her mother Ursula at Sholden in 1881 was George James's 2nd cousin as her father George Norris was the brother of George James's grandfather Thomas. In 1843 Sarah was christened Sarah Barwick Norris after her grandmother Sarah Barwick or Berwick who was Mrs Sarah Norris of Great mongeham.

Ursula was born in Sholden as Ursula Marsh around 1811, and married George Norris in Deal in 1831, and returned to live in the village (at Cottage place in 1841) untill her death in 1884. She had 8 children (called Norrice) born in the village between 1834-1843, namely Mary, Jane, Ester, George, Frances, Sarah (see above), John & Stephen.

Thomas Barwick, another relation of the Berwicks and Norris' above was found in Sholden in 1851. He is resident with his wife Sarah (born in the village about 1810) and their 2 children... Read more

Thomas Barwick

Sholden Church 1918, Deal
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Perhaps you would like to know more about Thomas Barwick. Sarah Goodborn was Thomas' s second wife and was possibly the sister of his first wife, Eliza Goodborn, who appears to have died in childbirth. He had three children with Eliza: John (1835), Helen (1839) and Thomas (1844, died in infancy). In 1851 Helen was a servant in a house at Northbourne. Thomas went to Tasmania in 1856; his parents had gone with his 4 youngest siblings in 1840. John had gone with his Uncle Richard in 1854 and had then applied for his father to follow. Thomas lived a quiet life in Tasmania, probably working for his father and brothers. John became a successful farmer and local councillor.Eliza married her cousin John. Helen, who was usually known as Ellen, married John Goldsmith and had 12 children. In her old age she reverted to using Helen. She died in Tasmania in 1931 at the age of 92. I am her namesake, Helen Barwick (although my parents were not aware of... Read more

Deal & local memories

Read and share memories of Deal and Kent inspired by Frith photos.

Lovely Deal

The Beach, Looking South 1924, Deal
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I spent many very happy holidays at my uncle's house, number 8 Beach Street directly behind the pub in the photo. It was an old house with very steep stairs with large ropes instead of handrails. It had no electricity although gas was fitted later. The large building to the right of the photo was bombed in the 2nd world war, it stayed a ruin until it was pulled down and made into gardens, later to become a crazy golf area. After the ruin had been pulled down, one could see across to the pier and right up to the Royal Hotel. I can remember the old pier being damaged by a boat anchored Walmer side of it, against the local fishermen's advice. I have so many great memories of Deal.

John Ford Havelock Road

I know you. You are the little boy who came skipping out of your house to tell us all that 'We had won the War'. I was born at No. 8 - all the children played together in that cul-de -sac. John Heard's sister was my best friend. My sister, brother and I went to Canada Road school. Mr Morris had to do all the admin as well as his role of Headmaster so the first period after prayers, we were left unsupervised to copy stuff from the bible. That's when all the mischief started like dipping girl's plaits in the inkwells! Lots of memories of the street games we played and those school years. Please get in touch.

Canada Road Primary School

Are there any pupils out there who went to Canada Road Primary School. Walmer, Deal. Kent, U.K. in the War years of 1941 to '45? The Headmaster's name was Mr Morris, and his favourite saying was: 'Open your books to page 43, and I don't want to hear another word out of you'. He then promptly nodded off to sleep, whilst we threw out 'nibbed' pens into the wooden ceiling, or tried dipping the hair of the girl in front into the ink well! On one occasion, I remember, during an air raid, whilst down in the shelter, getting married at the age of five, can't remember the name of that young girl, but we did have a best man and of course had to 'kiss the bride'. A favourite place to visit was the 'sweet shop' just across from the playground. On entering, the bell above the door gave a great ring and this kind elderly lady saw to our every need, from licorice root (those pieces of... Read more

Deal by Deafault!

The Plaque, Walmer Green c1955, Deal
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My wife spent many happy summers in Deal and Walmer with cousins/aunties/uncles/gran/gran-dad when on holiday from Swindon. She never stops talking about the Glen and mimicking her Welsh gran-dad saying he was going for a walk down Dover Road (you have to do the Dover Road bit in a Welsh accent). never fails to make me smile. I was born at the other end of Kent (Erith) and on the few visits we have made to visit family, can see why Deal charms the pants off you. The Jones's are all so lucky to be living there!

Childhood

The Promenade c1960, Deal
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Concerning Ricemans fire in Deal, Kent - Sunday 6th October 1963. Nightfall; I remember the incredible display windows, they were smashed and collapsing, a few people (including a guy who did some plumbing for my mum) managed to get some prime clothing out and scarpered. The local law and firemen were busy trying to secure the bank on the corner! The next day that was all that was standing. Deal wasn’t the only Ricemens shop to go up in flames in the area at that period! I do remember passing through the Deal shop as a 8-9 year old to put our feet in a machine where you could see the bones, it was supposed to tell you what size shoes you should buy! That 1962- 1964 was full of supposed arsonists / insurance jobs, impresive indeed were the farms, Sandwich Wood depot, garages and house fires, even cars (Rolls Royce) over the cliff edge! All I was interested with was cycling at low tide to go lugging in... Read more

Ace School of Ballroom Dancing

St Leonard's Church 1918, Deal
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The 'Ace Ballroom School of Dancing' was for many a young person the first time they had expeienced the close up contact with the opposite sex, I remember the beginning of placing our hands on each others shoulders and desperately trying not to step on each others toes, not easy! Hands were damp and nerves were on edge trying too hard to do the right thing. Mr Redman I seem to remember was one of the teachers and it was run by Mr and Mrs Whidett, son was Malcolm and his sister, I can't remember her name, but they made it all look easy. As time went on and afer numerous lessons it all fell into place and the 'Quick-step' and 'Waltz' became things to look forward to and the music and lights and the holding of one's partner were the most amazing beautiful memories that one could have. One could fall in love completely on those evenings, and on leaving, I remember the feeling to this day that my... Read more

Betteshanger Cycling Club

St Leonard's Church 1918, Deal
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Do you remember those meetings on a Sunday morning when the cycle club turned out for a day trip to Hastings or Dymchurch, maybe to Rye, etc. In charge was Harry Falvis, (not sure of the spelling), a short stocky man from the North of England. We assembled at St. Leonard's, sometimes as many as twelve, and off we went, led by Harry. His two daughters and son often made up the party and a great time was had by all, stopping at seaside cafes for a cuppa and a sandwich, etc. Race meetings, or time trials for 10 miles were often held, my best time was 22 min. 26 sec. I expect that's pretty slow for nowadays. Then there were the hill climbs at St. Margeret's Bay, boy! that was tough. We got to the top, chest heaving and heart pounding, great memories though. Then there was the trip to Deal seafront Beach Parlour, sitting there watching all the girls go by! Many romances took place there, where one... Read more

Nelson House Restaurant, Broad Street, Deal, Kent

St Leonard's Church 1918, Deal
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Where Deal Library stands today was the site of the 'Nelson House Restaurant', which was owned and ran by my father, Frederick William Ford; around the corner in Middle Street, was 'Lady Hamilton's Cottage', where Lord Nelson was supposed to have had an affair with Lady Hamilton! Diagonally opposite the restaurant was a sweet shop and on the corner oppostite was a public house. Next to the 'Nelson House' was a small garage and further down towards the traffic lights, was 'Allens' the hairdresser. As a small boy I spent much of my time on the beach swimming and rowing skiffs hired out by Freddy Upton - he and his wife had a small hut on the beach, which had inside a colourful parrot. To pay for the skiff I used to grease the skids for the long boats to enter the water (fishing parties), and bait up 'Lug Worms' from Sandwigh Bay. I remember one year, the herrings were so plentiful you could scoop them out with a... Read more

Amusement Arcade And Roller Skating Rink

The Promenade c1960, Deal
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I grew up in Deal, spent many hours in this shelter, from around 1961, it is still there today. My fondest memories of that time are: directly opposite across the road was a roller skating rink and amusement arcade, cafe and a round bingo hut, later the bingo hut was removed and replaced with swing boats. I loved my time there. I have only one picture of myself on the rink, but cannot see the other attractions, I am trying to locate some pictures of it all, but without luck so far...does anyone have any please? I would love to see them.

Memories

St Leonard's Church 1918, Deal
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My parents were married here on 13th January 1945. The church is at the bottom of Rectory road, which is where I lived and I used to go to the service on Sundays. I remember being given a little card with a picture of violets on it to take home for Mother's day. I was also married here on 27th April 1963, a beautiful sunny day.

Memorial Hospital

Deal War Memorial Hospital 1924, Deal
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The two photos are of Deal War Memorial Hospital on London Road. My brother's godmother, Margaret Paxton, used to be Matron of the Hospital. My father and brother had operations there, my grandfather passed on there and my godmother was a Head Nurse.

Sandown Castle

Sandown Castle 1906, Deal
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My memory of Sandown Castle was that by the time we were children the sea had washed it away and all that was left were flat stones. You had to pass it to go along the sea trail to the golf course at the north end of Deal. Also that, if I am correct, it is the only castle that Henry VIII built to help protect our shores from invasion that did not survive the elements. The sea can be pretty rough up there as seen in the photo but so invigorating!

St Leonards Church, Deal

St Leonard's Church 1918, Deal
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My parents had to walk from High Street, Deal to this church on the coldest and snowiest day recorded up to that time for my baptism in February 1947. My godparents were Hazle Rennie (nurse at Deal Hospital), Ena Wilkins (ballet dancer friend of Mother's who lived to be 100) and Bob Eliot (a friend from the Second World War days). We then became parishioners at St George's, Deal, till we moved to Walmer and went to St Mary's.

Deal Promenade 1910

The Promenade c1960, Deal
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In  my young days the greater part of the Prom was crowded with fishing boats. My grandfather, Ted Smith, often purchased the whole of a boatmens' catch. An entry in  his old ledger [sadly destroyed in the war] had 'a cran of herrings' for a shilling - a 'cran' was a thousand  fish. These were filletted and smoked, at the rear of his premises at 3 Alfred Square, or hawked in the town and around Sandwich.

Riceman's Fire

The Promenade c1960, Deal
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Riceman's fire was Sunday 6th October 1963. I am researching a book on Deal's shops and have been given the local newspaper for that week. The front page banner headline is "Deal store destroyed by fire." And the introduction reads "Within 90 minutes of first being spotted, fire reduced Deal's largest departmental store, Riceman's, to a jungle of twisted steel girders late on Sunday afternoon ..."

A few weeks ago the East Kent Mercury headlines were of Deal's last department store closing, namely Laughton's originally Baldwins. Last week a headline was "Workers say farewell as Woolworths store shuts." Sad times.

I remember the pony and trap on the seafront in the early 1950s and have a photo of it somewhere in the family albums, taken outside the amusement arcade at the top of King Street. The Regent Bingo Hall, formerly the Regent cinema closed last week.

Deal High Street - The Other End!

High Street c1955, Deal
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I spent my youth with my family "above the shop" in Deal High Street.  My father, Morris Orchard, first worked in, then inherited, the family shoe shop, which had been in business since my great grandfather's time.  In those days it was F. H. Orchard and Son, Bespoke Bootmaker - we still had stationery lying around with his name on it, and out the back we had the workshop, still with old tools, bits of leather and so on. It passed to my grandfather, M. H. Orchard, whom I remember as a very gruff, frightening old man, who had been injured in the First World War and only got around with difficulty. My father Morris lived his whole life over the shop, except for his war service, his parents moving out after his marriage to Peggy, a library assistant (he proposed on a library reservation card!).  I was born in December 1949, my sister Nic in 1952, and my brother Adrian some time later in 1958. We all attended the... Read more

Regent Cinema

The Promenade c1960, Deal
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My family were Skinners of Deal.  My mum Sheila used to work at the Regent cinema on the sea-front.  I used to love being able to go & see films over & over when she as working there, (I remember seeing "The Music Man" 7 times!).  Does anyone remember the little pony & trap that used to give rides to the children?  It used to leave from round the entrance to the pier & go along the sea-front and back - a treat indeed for us kids.  There also used to be a photographer who used to stand by the pier & take day-tripper's photos.  Does anyone remember the old man (or so he seemed to me as a child), who used to sell matches outside Woolworths (I think it was).  He had medals across his chest & used to have his tray of goods round his neck.  I also vaguely recall a barrel organ & little monkey in the High Street.  Finally, does anyone recall when Ricemans went up... Read more

Piddock And Smiths

The Promenade c1960, Deal
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My gt. grandfathers married sisters named Brothers. The three familes have been in and around Deal for centuries Gt. grandfather Maxwell was a Royal Marine, as was grandfather Piddock.  My father 'Phys' Pidddock was welterweight boxing champ RM in 1925. Smiths were in the fish trade. Ted Smith had the first Fish and Shop in Deal [North side of Alfred Square] well before WW1. Grandfather Piddock had sweet shop in London Road opp. the Parochial School. I worked at Lamberts Laundries and left Deal 1964 to enter legal profession. I recall the summer days swimming, the boatmen, the outbreak of war, evacuation to South Wales, our return to the damaged town we loved, the decline of the laundry trade [we once served hundreds of houses, hotels, the Royal Marine depot etc.]. In 1945 I worked at Swaffields Laundry, College Road with Bert Penn, Bill Spicer. On home visits I always look up old friends and quietly walk the streets  in reverie.

Shelter

The Promenade c1960, Deal
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How could I forget these shelters (there were two of them)? We moved to North Deal in 1954 when I was 10. The shelter at the top of Farrier Street was nearest to me - a place to stand in a storm, I practised hitting hockey balls against the concrete steps, my beloved Granny used to sit on one side and watch the sea, our tenant, in Indian Army officer (retired and without much money) used to sit in the shelter too, very lonely I think, remembering better times. They were the refuge of lovers at night, of fishermen at dawn, of mothers with prams and toddlers on hot summer days. Last time I was in Deal (2007) 'my' shelter was pretty well derelict, the glass all gone, the walls defaced with graffiti. My son couldn't understand why I would stand in such a place staring at the sea, tears in my eyes; or why, without a word, I jumped from the sea wall onto the shingle and went... Read more

I Was Born in The Shop on Left Hand Side, White Fuller (Kent)

High Street c1955, Deal
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The shop on left hand side is White Fuller (Kent) Ltd, 68 High Street, Deal. My father, Cecil Prime, was the owner. Our mother, Phyllis, my brother John Prime and myself lived there. John and I were both born there he in 1948 and myself in 1947. We spent all our formative years here. I have been looking for photos of this building to include in a memory book for my brother's birthday. If there are any other photos around from 1947-1960 I would be interested. John joined the Royal Navy and retired as a Commander and now lives in Portsmouth. I worked at Pfizer, married David Wellard, moved to Hong Kong in 1972 and then to New York State in 1977. We retired to Florida in 1999. The building next door was Brown and Phillips.

Spitfire

Beach Street 1924, Deal
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About 1943 - disabled Spitfire landed 30 yards from beach opposite Golden Hind cafe and just beyond hotel on right.  3 or 4 chaps stripped off, swam out and pulled pilot from aircraft.  I hope pilot survived but don't know if he did.  Does anyone know?

Happy Days.

I was 16 yrs old when I moved to Deal with my parents; we moved into a lovely old house in Cowper Road. I soon made friends. I used to go into a coffee bar called The Good Intent, it was always busy, the duke box was always playing Buddy Holly and so many others songs. I used to go dancing a lot too, I had lots of happy memories in Deal. I have been back a couple of times - hasn't changed much, happy days...

Deal Railway Station

I moved to Deal when I was 3. We lived in a house owned by the railway in the station approach. My father was linesman on the railway. I went to the parochial school on London Road. The Headmaster was Mr Scholl and my teacher, Mr Rose. My father's name was Ernest Turner and my mother's was Lily. Her maiden name was Skinner. I had a brother called Brian. On leaving school I worked in Riceman's and also the sweet shop in London Road. It was owned by a Mr Corcoran. He also had one in South Street opposite the bus office where I later worked until I got married in 1962. I can remember a small garage being next door and think it was called Bourners. Opposite the station was a coal yard with an office. Freddie Wisdom (brother of Norman) worked in there. Next door to that the Eagle Tavern. Near the railway fence was a small cafe/cabin that sold hot drinks etc and think it was... Read more

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