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St Oswald's Church 1918, Durham

St Oswald's Church 1918, Durham
 
 

St Oswald's Church 1918, Durham Ref: 68226

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Church

North Road c1955, Durham
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Can anyone remember the church (methodist) you could go in from North Road or from Crossgate, across from St Margaret's Church! I remember the family living in the church house - the Parks (June/Madaline)?

University Days - Rag Week

New Lecture Rooms, Palace Green 1929, Durham
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The floats for the Rag Procession always lined up on Palace Green before setting out through Durham City and in 1956 - my final year - I went to see them as they were being judged. The 1st prize - a barrel of beer - was won by Bernard Gilpin Society on this occasion . The theme of the Rag was "TV or not TV" and their float had the name "Highway Control" (Patrol) the name of a TV programme of those days, and some students dressed up as convicts with suits covered with arrows! I have a photo of the then Mayor Councillor Naylon and his wife looking at the float before presenting the prize. When I had this developed, the man in the photo shop (Fillinghams) said that never before had he seen a photo of the Mayor smiling!

Uiversity Days - Rag Week

New Lecture Rooms, Palace Green 1929, Durham
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Sorry - I got it wrong - the year of my memory of Rag Week was 1959. One of the other memories on this site related to Councillor Thurlow, who was Mayor of Durham in 1956. In that year - November - the Queen Mother came to Durham and visited us at St. Mary's College; Councillor Thurlow was there to greet her, and I have a photo of him with the Royal visitor.

Remember it Well

Silver Street c1955, Durham
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I recognize all the places you're talking about as I lived in Durham until 1970. I remember having piano lessons from Mrs Pratt, I was friends with Kenny. I now live in Cyprus, happy in retirement .

Traffic Policeman And St Hilds Demonstration School

The Traffic Policeman 1954, Durham
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I remember the traffic policeman very well. I lived at The Morlands (25) from c1945 to c1953. I went to Framwellgate Nursery School, and the to St. Hilds Demonstration School until the age of about 8yrs, when we moved to Nottingham. My mother, who is 106 years old, spent time working at the munitions factory at Newton Aycliffe during the war. My grandparents lived at Carville, (near the chipshop!). Unfortunately I have no photos to post, but I would love to hear from anyone attending St Hilds Demonstration school, and also can anyone remember visiting the sweet shop near to Doggarts, where we used to buy our chewing wood and horlicks tablets?

Great Memories of Durham City

Silver Street c1955, Durham
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My Uncle Gordon was the police man who used to sit in the police box at the top of the street in the market square directing traffic. This was around 1950s. I used to live in Meadowfield and came to Durham many, many times growing up. Great memories. I now live in Devon, but think of Durham always. I used to go to a fish and chip shop in the corner of the market place in the early 60s. MMMM they were awesome. A bag of chips and some batters. Cost about sixpence. Then the bus back to Brandon. WOW what a memory trip.

Memory Lane1959/1960

The Traffic Policeman 1954, Durham
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In 1959 I was a poultry student at Durham school of agriculture (Houghall) on the out skirts of the city. I lived at the college for nearly a year. My memories of my time there and times spent around the city are still fresh in my mind. Places like the ice rink, all the old streets and shops,walking up Silver Street and the policeman contoling traffic in the square - that was a novelty. The coffee bar opposite the bus station, I think it was called Demabros? The pubs that us students used: Spread Eagle, Market Tavern, County Hotel and the Rose Tree at Shincliff. Durham City is just fab-fab-fab.

A Durham Lad Through And Through

Silver Street c1955, Durham
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Yes, I remember this street so well as a young boy, I lived up Crossgate at the Angel Inn then Claypath at The Wheatsheaf. I was Christened at St Margarets half way up Crossgate and went to school at The Blue Coat, then Wnney Hill Sec Mod ( Sadly I have just been informed it has been torn down for a housing estate... ). Silver Street was my center of gravity just after the war and I spent many happy hours with my brothers Bryan and Jimmy staring in the shop windows, particularly the sweety shop by the bridge, Woolies at the top near the market, Dewhursts the butchers and so on. The early Beilby family were silversmith engravers near the back lane, a shortcut behind Silver Street that went to The Advertiser. I could go on for hours with memories of this wonderful city, the Miners Gala Day down at the race course, our own fish and chip shop up Claypath by the Post Office... Read more

Durham Cathedral

From Railway Station 1892, Durham
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My granddad and nana, Lydia and Alan Field, lived in the house under the arches to the Cathedral. He was the porter and I remember helping him ring the bell in the cathedral. His office or Lodge as we called it was opposite the house. It was filled with stuffed animals. I also remember the Queen when she visited and presented my Granddad with Maundy money for his services to the Cathedral. I lived in Pity Me with mum, dad and three brothers and two sisters. My maiden name was Bell. I wonder if anyone remembers them or me.

St Godrics

St Godric's Roman Catholic Church 1918, Durham
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My grandfather,  John Benjamin Slack, was the organist at St Godric's Church for many many years before he died in 1924.  The house visible on the photo at the end of the road is 67 North Road - this was where  my great great grandfather Richard Lindsley and his family lived in the 1880s.  It looks just the same today!

Arrival in Durham

From Railway Station 1892, Durham
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This the view one saw when arriving in Durham by train from Kings Cross, but nowadays most of the little houses between the station and the city have vanished. The heart of the city lies in a horseshoe-shaped bend in the River Wear, and on the left in the picture is the Castle, and on the right the Norman Cathedral, both of which were part of my life when I attended Durham University from 1956-1959. In those days the city was small, with 3.000 inhabitants, and we 1.500 students considerably swelled the population at term time. Nowadays there are far more students and colleges.

My Time at University

Market Place c1955, Durham
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The market place is at the very centre of Durham City, and on the left of the picture can be seen the City Hall, where we not only had the Saturday night "hop", but also took exams. On the right is Doggatts Store where if I remember right, we had to buy our gowns, college blazers and scarves and squares ("mortarboards").

Daily Walk to Lectures

Prebends Bridge 1892, Durham
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While I was at Durham University I attended St. Mary's College, on the opposite side of the River Wear from the City centre, and every day I had to walk across this bridge over the river, which was strictly a footbridge. The only car allowed to cross it was the ancient one owned by the Chancellor Sir James Duff. Through the central arch can be seen an old mill, which was turned into an archaeology department while I was at the University.

University Days

No 1 South Bailey 1923, Durham
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This was one of the streets I walked along when going to the lecture rooms on Palace Green. On the left is No.1, the large house belonging to St.John's Theological College, and on the right is the arched entrance to the Cathedral close.

Walk to Palace Green

St Mary-Le-Bow 1918, Durham
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While at University my daily walk led me up Dun Cow Lane, on the left of this photo. In 1956 the railings in front of the houses had all disappeared. The ancient church of St.Mary-le-Bow was built of sandstone, and as it stood on a rather draughty and exposed corner, the soft stone suffered badly from wind erosion - I can remember the big holes which eventually formed in the ashlars. Later it was closed because it became unsafe. I don't know whether it has since been restored and reopened, because I haven't been back to Durham since 1973.

Palace Green

The Cathedral c1955, Durham
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This beautiful photo of the splendid Norman Cathedral was taken just before I started studying at the University, and brings back pleasant memories. In the foreground is Palace Green, a dignified lawn, and on the right can be seen the low Students' Union building and the building of the University Library, both of which I knew well..

Court Cases

Shire Hall 1921, Durham
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As I was reading politics, I and my fellow students were advised to go and listen to court cases held in the Shire Hall. I remember doing so at least once, and it was most impressive. on the right had side of the picture can be seen the Castle keep. Students at University College had rooms in this keep.

River Wear

The Cathedral 1903, Durham
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This is the famous and wellbeloved view of the Cathedral with the three towers - one can climb the central tower - the Galilee Chapel and houses occupied by Cathedral officials as seen from Prebends Bridge and the bank of the River Wear, which I saw and enjoyed every day while I was at University. Beneath the Cathedral is the old mill which was later made into the archaeology department.

Student Dances And Exams

The Town Hall Interior 1918, Durham
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In the great hall of the town hall we had the Saturday evening dances or "hops", and also took exams, so this view brings back many memories!

Student Balls

The Castle Great Hall 1921, Durham
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While I was at University all the balls were held in this wonderful hall, and seeing it in this picture certainly brings back pleasant memories. Somewhere I still have my ball cards. Underneath it was a crypt, or undercroft, where the student societies held some of their meetings.

My Time at University, 1956-59

New Lecture Rooms, Palace Green 1929, Durham
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In these lecture rooms, built of stone, I attended most lectures. I don't expect the rooms are used for this purpose now, because the number of students has vastly increased since my days. On the left is the Castle keep, and in the foreground is the well-kept lawn of Palace Green.

Childhood

The Traffic Policeman 1954, Durham
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I lived near Durham from 1955 to 1972 when I went off to university. My mother lived in Belmont nearby until her death in 1994.
I remember well the funny little traffic control booth and Doggarts in the background. We always shopped in Doggarts and I was always fascinated by the way the money shot round the store in 'capsules' around the ceilings when you made a purchase. I went to the Grammar School up the road and in the early days queued for my bus to Belmont in the Market place.
Unfortunately I now have no reason to visit Durham - its a great place - jam packed full of history - which I dont think I appreciated as a young person.

SILVER STREET

Framwellgate Bridge And The Castle 1892, Durham
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SOME OF MY ANCESTORS LIVED AT 9 SILVER ST JUST OVER THE BRIDGE FROM FRAMWELLGATE
JAMES ROBERT THURLOW WAS A LEATHER CUTTER AND CURRIER BUT LATER BECAME THE OWNER OF THE WEAR BREWERY AT FRAMWELLGATE WATERSIDE

FAMILY TREE

Silver Street c1955, Durham
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MY GREAT GREAT GRANDFATHER LIVED AT 9 SILVER ST.HIS DAUGHTER ELIZABETH WAS BORN THERE IN 1846. 5 YEARS AGO I VISITED THE SHOP WHICH STANDS THERE NOW AND THEY TOOK ME ROUND THE PREMISES AND SHOWED ME WHERE THE FAMILY WOULD LIVE BACK THEN. THE ORIGINAL POLISHED WOOD STAIR BANISTER WAS STILL THERE, AND I RAN MY HAND OVER THE PLACE WHERE MY ANCESTORS RAN THEIR HANDS, AND IT WAS VERY MOVING FOR ME.I WAS SO GLAD THE HOUSE WAS STILL THERE.
JAMES ROBERT THURLOW WAS A LEATHER CUTTER AND CURRIER BUT LATER HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE WEAR BREWERY FRAMWELLGATE WATERSIDE

JAMES THURLOW

St Mary The Less Church 1918, Durham
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JAMES THURLOW WAS MY GT GT GT GT GRANDFATHER, BORN 1752 .HE DIED 1820 AND WAS BURIED IN THE CHURCHYARD OF ST MARY THE LESS WITH HIS FIRST WIFE MARY WHO DIED 1803, AND SARAH , HIS DAUGHTER BY HIS SECOND WIFE MARGARET
THIS CHURCHYARD WAS RESERVED FOR TRADESPEOPLE AND NOTABLES, AND JAMES WAS AN INNKEEPER, AT "THE HORNS" MILLBURNGATE, WHICH WAS DEMOLISHED BEFORE THE NEW SHOPPING CENTRE WAS BUILT

My Dad's Barber Shop

Framwellgate Bridge And The Castle 1892, Durham
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My dad had a barber shop near there if I remember correctly.

First Memory of Durham

From Railway Station 1892, Durham
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My first memories of Durham is being taken be my aunty Audrey and uncle Alan. They had instructions to buy my sister and I a tartan skirt from the market. I remember having a boat ride on the river Wear.
Durham is my 'Tara', the place where I need to return to to get my inner peace restored.

My Early Years 1943-1953

I was born in Durham 1943, I lived with my grandparents at 51 Old Elvet opposite the what was then the Shire Hall. My grandparents ran a boarding house where lots of business people would stay some from America and Canada etc..I had a very serious accident in Peelaw woods when I was about 9 years of age, I was unconcious for around 10 days. I was in the chlidren's hospital for about 3 weeks . My grandmother died in march 1953, the house was sold, we moved to Birmingham. I eventually came to Australia but every time I visit the Uk I make a pilgramage to Durham. I have some of the fondest memories growng up there, in fact 51 is still there with the same door, it's been repainted different colours over the years.It adjoins a vennel and I often ran down the vennel to the river and along the old racetrack and the cricket ground. Yes, I love Durham.

My Mother Sarah Jane White

My mum was born in Brandon in 1910, one of 14 children. She sailed to Australia on the Vedic in 1926 and sadly never returned to Brandon. My son and I visited Brandon in 2010 and were disappointed to find that the street where she was born, Sunderland Street and surrounds is gone, replaced by a new housing estate. I guess we should have gone sooner. However, we spent 3 days in Durham visiting the Cathedral, Castle etc. I fell in love with the area and people and could happily live there. As I am now 73 years old I will have to stay at home in Australia and enjoy my wonderful memories and photographs. Thank you to the kind and warm people of Durham.

The Tin School And Thurlow Family

I was a pupil at the Tin School in Gilesgate Moor staring in 1954, leaving in 1961. It was at the crossroads of the road that now leads to Tesco, but opposite was the Durham District Services garage where my dad was a driver. I remember playing in the air raid shelters in the playing fields with the sausage factory out the back. My mam was Mary Thurlow, and my uncle John (Jackie) Thurlow, Mayor of Durham in 1956. My grandfather is John Henry Thurlow who was a foreman at Gradons, North Road, and my great grandfather owned the brewery in Framwellgate. I am lucky to have two stone bottles bearing the name found when a site was being excavated in Durham, presented by Norman Richardson to my uncle. I still live near Durham, and for all it's faults it is a great city.

North Road

From the 40s until 1964, I used to live at 46 North Road next to the Station Hotel. Our house had a long garden with a stone-pillared gate and 4 steps from the street. I would walk every day up Atherton St, around the 'workhouse' to St Margaret's Primary School on Margery lane. Then from 1954 until 1960 up Redhills Lane to the Johnston School. My mother was a Court Dressmaker (trading as Madam Barbara) who designed and sewed wedding dresses etc for cathedral weddings of the local bigwigs. One of her best customers was Lady Doxford of the shipbuilding family. I later worked at the Midland Bank on Saddler St (now HSBC). I now live in Canada but visit Durham as often as possible.

The Tin School

This is for Martyn Walker. I do remember the Tin School, but not in the 1960s however. I was a student there from 1941-1948. I just found this site by accident, it got me thinking about the Tin School. Then I came across your comments about it. So, I joined this site. It was, of course, partly during the war. In my class, we had a few students that were evacuated from the South of England, where most of the bombing was occurring. We also had an underground air raid shelter. I left Durham for the USA in September of 1948. I have been back several times to visit my cousin.

The Tin School, Belmont

Does anyone reacll the 'Tin School'? It was a primary school situated in Belmont, I went there in the early 1960's as we lived in Belmont. I recall the school was made of possibly corrugated iron and was on a crossroads or junction. Our family lived at various places around County Durham until 1966 when we moved South due to my dads job. I am now aged 54yrs and live live in Essex UK. Be interested to hear from anyone from the early 1960's who went to the 'Tin School'.

Lovegreen Street

My maternal grandmother lived in Lovegreen Street from around 1900 until 1957 when she moved in with my family in Framwellgate Moor. Her name was Parkinson and I believe her house was the first one as you turned the corner into the street. She died in 1968 aged 91 having brought up 10 children in that tiny house. It had 1 room downstairs and 2 rooms upstairs with a cold water tap in the downstairs scullery. I wish I had a picture of the street. I have pictures of myself and other family members in the back yard and pictures of my grandfather and uncles next to the pigeon lofts but non of the street itself. Does anyone know what year it was torn down? From recent visits I think the area is now a car park. My mother who died in 2007 talked lovingly of living in the street and mentioned the ferry many times. I believe the foot bridge over the river is named the penny bridge as... Read more

Lovegreen Street

My paternal grandmother lived in Lovegreen Street and died when I was 11 years old. Her name was Hanley. She was 80+ when she died and had brought up 6 children in this tiny terraced cottage. I used to visit with my dad and do remember that there was a family with name of Loftus. The ferry was no longer in existence then but my mother told me the story of when she was a little girl and lived at Brasside, they all walked through the fields to the ferry and went across to Gilesgate goods station to collect furniture which had been sent by mail order. They all carried a piece to the ferry and walked all the way to Brasside again. This must have been in the 1920s. She also told me that the Lady of the Manor, Crookhall, used to invite the residents of Lovegreen Street for strawberry tea on one day of the year. I remember the house in Lovegreen Street to this day as well as... Read more

Lovegreen And Loftus Families - The Ferry

I am descended from Robert Lovegreen, a shoemaker in Framwellgate.  The Lovegreen family, and subsequently the Loftus family (Martin Loftus having married Margaret Lovegreen) ran the rowing boat ferry across the river wear from Framwellgate to the Sands.  This ferry ceased around the second world war.  Is there anyone out there who remembers the families or the ferry?  I have tried without success to find a photo of the ferry - does anyone have one?

I was always told that Lovegreen Street was built by one of the family.   If anyone has any information about the street, or any old photos of it, I would love to hear your memories.

The Lovegreen family were descended from Andreas Lofgren.  They were a large family and I am in touch with several descendents.  I would love to hear from any other Lovegreen descendents who could add to our family history.

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