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Greater Manchester Photographic Memories

Greater Manchester Photographic Memories

Selected extracts and photos


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Leigh, Market Street c1950 (ref. L181002)
Leigh was a market town that prospered on coal, cotton, and silk. It is also the last resting place of Sir Thomas Tyldesley, who had accompanied the Earl of Derby's 1651 invasion of Lancashire from the Isle of Man in support of Charles II. Derby had expected to join up with the King at Wigan, but instead clashed with and was routed by Robert Lilburne's Parliamentarian troops. The Earl was with the King at the Battle of Worcester, but was later captured and executed at Bolton. He his buried in the family vault at Ormskirk. Add your own Memory
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Littleborough, the Harbour, Hollingworth Lake c1955 (ref. L182006)
Here we see the harbour on Hollingworth Lake. Not only were rowing boats, racing skiffs and dinghies a common sight, but there was even a time when the lake had its own paddle steamer. As can be seen in photograph 36777, Hollingworth supported a number of hotels, one of which, the Beach, featured refreshment rooms that overhung the water and a dancing stage for 2,000 people. Another hotel, The Lake, was designed in the Swiss Chalet style.Add your own Memory
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Littleborough, Hollingworth Lake c1960 (ref. L182010)
This view shows Hollingworth on a glorious summer's day, with both the paddle boats and the ice cream vans doing brisk trade. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Art Gallery and Mosley Street c1885 (ref. 18285)
In 1824 the Royal Manchester Institution was hoping to move into a new headquarters in Mosley Street, and in the accepted practice of the day invited architects to submit their ideas by means of open competition. The winner was Charles Barry (1795-1860), who is best remembered for working in collaboration with Pugin on the designs for the House of Commons. The new building opened in 1834, but was taken over by Manchester Corporation in 1882 and became the City Art Gallery.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Owen's College c1876 (ref. 8295)
The college was founded in 1845 by John Owen, who left £100,000 for the purpose. The college later moved into a new building on Oxford Road which had been designed by Alfred Waterhouse, winner of the competition to design Manchester Town Hall. The new college buildings were officially opened by the Duke of Devonshire in October 1873. The buildings pictured here are still extant; they are hidden from the main road by later buildings. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Owens College, Oxford Road 1895 (ref. 36350)
As early as 1877 the Senate applied to the Privy Council for the college to be raised to a university, but the application was contested by similar institutions in Liverpool and Leeds. The outcome was the formation of the Victoria University. University College, Liverpool was admitted in 1884, and the Yorkshire College, Leeds in 1887. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, the Royal Jubilee Exhibition, the Royal Entrance 1887 (ref. 21901)
The idea that the celebration of Queen Victoria's jubilee should include an exhibition featuring Manchester's business, commerce, and industry was first discussed in 1886. A 32-acre site adjoining the Botanical Gardens at Old Trafford was chosen, as it had both rail and tramway connections. Note the mock-up of the cathedral tower.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Exhibition 1887 (ref. 21903)
Opened by the Prince of Wales on 3 May 1887, the exhibition ran for six months and attracted 4.75million visitors. The profit of £44,000 was handed over to the Whitworth Institute, who allocated £20,000 to establish a museum, £10,000 to develop a school of art, and £14,000 towards the new Technical School.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Blind Asylum c1885 (ref. 18307)
As early as 1810 the town had been left a substantial amount of money (£20,000) towards an institution for the blind. Unfortunately, the benefactor Thomas Henshaw had stipulated in his will that the money had to be spent on things other than buildings; that was paid for by public subscription and completed in 1837.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Peel Park 1889 (ref. 22167)
Peel Park was somewhere Salfordians could go and seek refuge for a few hours from the noise, muck, and drudgery of day-to-day living. In those days the main entrance to the park had an ornate arch, Brighton Pavilion meets the Taj Mahal in style, erected to commemorate Queen Victoria's visit of 1857. It was declared unsafe and demolished in July 1937.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, No 9 Dock c1965 (ref. M21503)
This view looks along No9 Dock looking towards No 2 Grain Elevator. The withdrawal of container traffic spelt the end for Manchester, and by the early 1980s the docks had been flattened in readiness for redevelopment, both for residential and leisure purposes.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Ship Canal, Grain Elevators c1965 (ref. M21502)
This photograph was taken several years before the opening of the container terminal on North No 9 Dock. Containerization traffic led Manchester Liners to restructure their fleet. Some ships, such as 'Manchester Progress' (8176 grt), were converted to cellular containerships, and new ships were ordered, such as 'Manchester Challenge' (12,000 grt) and her sisters 'Manchester Courage' and 'Manchester Concorde'. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, view from Victoria Hotel 1889 (ref. 21884)
Over on the left is Manchester Exchange station, opened by the London & North Western Railway in 1884 and famous for the long platform which linked it to Victoria Station. On the right is the tower of the cathedral, which was rebuilt between 1864 and 1867; the remainder of the cathedral was heavily restored during the 1880s. The statue of Oliver Cromwell by Matthew Noble was a gift to the city by Mrs Abel Heywood in memory of her first husband. Apparently Manchester was divided over whether or not to accept it. It was the first large-scale statue of Cromwell to be raised in the open anywhere in England. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Deansgate 1892 (ref. 30384)
The triangular-shaped Victoria Buildings was erected by the corporation in 1876 occupying an area of land bounded by Deansgate, Victoria Street, and St Mary's Gate. The corporation laid a circuit of tracks around the building which in-bound trams followed. This did away with the need to turn the trams, for by completing the circuit they would automatically be facing in the right direction for their next outward trip.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, the Cathedral 1889 (ref. 21870)
Dedicated to the Glorious Virgin and the holy martyrs St Denis and St George, the cathedral was originally built as a collegiate church by Thomas, Lord de la Warre, in the 15th century. It was the church's first warden, John Huntington, who built the choir; his successor added the nave, and the third warden widened the choir and added the clerestory. During restoration work in the 1880s some fragments of Saxon masonry was unearthed.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Victoria Building and Gateway c1890 (ref. 8288)
When completed, the Victoria Buildings had 31 shops on the ground floor and numerous suites of offices above. Through the centre of the complex ran the Victoria Arcade, whilst at the Victoria Street/Deansgate end was the 100-room Victoria Hotel. The building was destroyed during an air raid in December 1940. The site was later incorporated into the Arndale Centre development. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, St Ann's Square and Church 1886 (ref. 18265)
Once known as Acres Field, it was here for about 500 years that Manchester's weekly markets and annual fairs were held. In 1709 the foundation stone of St Ann's was laid; the church was a gift to the town from Lady Ann Bland. It was completed in 1712, and by the mid 18th century St Ann's was the fashionable part of town, the place to see and be seen in.Add your own Memory
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Manchester, St Ann's Square, the Cab Rank 1885 (ref. 18263)
This view looks towards the Royal Exchange and St Mary's Gate. This was one of the principal cab ranks in Manchester, and licensing, fares and conditions were regulated by the local authority. Cabs could be hired by time at 2s 6d per hour, or by distance, the fare dependant upon the number of people sharing. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Royal Exchange 1886 (ref. 18259)
The Royal Exchange was where the Lancashire cotton industry did business with the world. Covering 3699 square yards, the Exchange had accommodation for 6600 members when it was completed; it was opened in two phases, in 1871 and 1874. Add your own Memory
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Manchester, Royal Exchange 1885 (ref. 18262)
The floor of the Royal Exchange was the scene of frantic activity on Tuesdays and Fridays, when at the hour of High Exchange anything up to 6000 men would gather here and shout at one another. Though the floor appeared chaotic to the outsider, it was in fact well organised. Buyers, agents, manufacturers and merchants had their regular places. Those who did their business here would know where to find the Blackburn cotton manufacturers, or the Oldham cotton spinners, as well as cotton brokers, agents for the Indian and Chinese markets, and machinery manufacturers.Add your own Memory
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