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Brynmawr, Semtex Factory c.1965

Photo of Brynmawr, Semtex Factory c.1965

Brynmawr, Semtex Factory c.1965

Ref. B730103

Memories of Brynmawr

Synagogue

Brynmawr, my home town, although I haven't lived there for nigh on 40 years, it's still home. I have good and bad memories of Brynmawr. I was always regarded as a blacksheep, rebel, so ...Read full memory

A memory of Brynmawr by Colin Bennett

Synagogue

Brynmawr. Although I've lived away from here for nigh on 40 years, I still regard this place as home. I was, and although thankfully grown up now, always regarded as a bit of a black ...Read full memory

A memory of Brynmawr by Colin Bennett

Semtex Ltd

I worked in the factory for six months in 1962 as part of a management training programme with Dunlop. The work was mainly the production of vinyl asbestos tiles but there was a unit for ...Read full memory

A memory of Brynmawr by David Osborne

My Hometown

Brynmawr is a quiet little town on the edge of the valley roads. These photos bring back memories of all the hills I climbed, picnics on the mountain, paddling in the pond across from ...Read full memory

A memory of Brynmawr by Jackie Haynes

This photo is available to buy in a range of sizes and styles, including framed and on canvas.

About this photo

This rubber factory was built between 1947 and 1953; it was thought to be a visionary building, not least for its roof made up of nine rectangular domes with windows on each of their sides. It is a sad fact that the site became derelict after the factory shut in the early 1980s. Despite a campaign to preserve it, the last phase of its demolition began in 2001.

This is an excerpt from Around Alton Photographic Memories, by Tony Cross/Jane Hurst/Martin Morris

This rubber factory was built between 1947 and 1953; it was thought to be a visionary building, not least for its roof made up of nine rectangular domes with windows on each of their sides. It is a sad fact that the site became derelict after the factory shut in the early 1980s. Despite a campaign to preserve it, the last phase of its demolition began in 2001.