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Powis Street 1962, Woolwich

Powis Street 1962, Woolwich
 
 

Powis Street 1962, Woolwich Ref: W460007

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Woolwich's local area

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Memories of Powis Street 1962, Woolwich

Shopping at 'Woolies'

Powis Street 1962, Woolwich
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I never got down Powys Street that often but loved to spend ages in 'Woolies' or the F.W. Woolworth Co. shop where they had row upon row of bunks full of all this marvelous stuff !!

Woolwich, Powis Street

Powis Street 1962, Woolwich
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I remember Woolwich town centre in the 1960's when I was a kid. In this picture I believe you can just see Garrets department store on the left which was a big rival to Cuffs department store a bit further back (out of shot). It was Cuffs store that provided my school uniform for Eglinton school. I also remember going to the restaurant upstairs in the RACS, not often as it was a silver service restaurant, a bit posh for us, as we lived in a prefab in Cleanthus Road, Shooters Hill. Is there any one who has similar memories, in particular anyone living in the prefabs Cleanthus Road between 1962 and 1967.

Woolwich Town Centre

Powis Street 1962, Woolwich
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I remember very fondly Woolwich market & town centre in the 60's & 70's. Cuffs department store always seemed so imposing with polished wooden floors, we had to go there to get my school uniform for Notre Dame Convent in Eglington Road. Christmas time always meant a visit to the store to see Santa's grotto, and a ride up in the lift which was always manned. My favourite department was the downstairs jewellery dept, (still love a bit of bling now) it had a wood and glass case which revolved round and you pressed a button to stop it at your favourite item. Mum used to treat herself and have her hair done there too. Garretts Store was mainly furniture and there was a lovely toy shop, Branstons, at the top of Powis Street.
My Saturdays consisted of going swimming to Woolwich Baths, drying our hair outside the building round the back from the warm air outlet pipes, getting a bag of chips and pickled onion and eating... Read more

Garetts

Powis Street 1962, Woolwich
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I was born in Woolwich in 1948. The things I remember of the shops in Powis St; David Greggs was where my mother would send me for ham off the bone, I also remember Biddles Fruit and Veg which was just off the High St. The R.A.C.S. Department Store where I would have my hair cut in the barbers on the top floor. There was also a Men's and Boys Outfitters in Hare St opposite Burton, can't remember the name. It is where my Mother would buy all my Sunday suits and school uniforms. I think it burned down and never reopened . The fish and chip shop in Parson Road, or was it the Green where the buses stopped outside the Odeon. There was also a very good fish and chips hut on the bridge where I think M& S is now. In 1961 at the age of 15 my first job was in Garretts as a young salesman in the luggage department. I was paid £3 a... Read more

Callis Yard Stables

Powis Street 1962, Woolwich
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Callis Yard Stables are just behind Powis Street today, they have been unused for many years. The council sold them in 2008 and since then the building has stood unused and ready for redevelopment. I was wondering if anyone had any information about the stables or knew someone who worked there? I am keen to find out more. Any anecdote, big or small, would be welcomed!

Woolwich & local memories

Read and share memories of Woolwich and Greater London inspired by Frith photos.

Old Woolwich

Market 1963, Woolwich
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I have such fond memories of Woolwich, I was born in 1962 in Erith Maternity Hospital in Barnehurst. I lived for a while with grandparents at General Gordan Place before my parents got their own place at 17b Glendale Road, Erith. I remember both my grandparents houses and loved visiting. The house on General Gordan Place was a army home opposite Woolwich Common and had 4 floors. Everyone that visited entered through the basement door and that's where everything happened - the kitchen and dining room were there. My grandmother was Chinese and met my grandad in China while he was fighting the Japanese; he was a Japanese pow. My granma also worked on Woolwich market in the 70's/80's on the fruit and veg stall, she was well known as Plum. My grandparents had 10 children so the house was always busy and we all came for her famous Chinese food. My maternal grandparents live in a wonderful tardis-like house, 38 Whitworth Road SE18, just off Herbert Road. It looked... Read more

Pre-War Woolwich And Shooter's Hill

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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As a very young lad I lived on Ankerdine Crescent on Shooter's Hill, but Mum frequently took me down to Woolwich for shopping on the market. I can clearly remember a butcher's stall close to Powis Street where the cry related to 'Lamb's tickers' (lamb's hearts), something I sorely miss these days, living here in Sweden. What the Swedes do with the lamb's tickers I'll never know. We also took trips across the river on the old paddle-wheel steam ferries. Our next-door neighbour but one was one of the engineers on the ferry, and we often looked in at the control room where he stood at the controls of one of the paddle wheels. It was fascinating seeing the shiny piston rods at work, and all the polished brasswork. You got into trouble if you simply went to and fro on the ferry, so we used to go ashore on the north side, wait for that ferry boat to return, and then came back to our south shore again. And yes... Read more

Woolwich Ferry

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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There has been a ferry at Woolwich for many centuries but the people of Woolwich complained in the 1880s that West London had free access across the River Thames by bridges so why couldn't they have free travel? The river was too busy to put a bridge over and there was not room to put in a tunnel so the newly formed London County Council decided to provide a free ferry service with boats large enough to accomodate vehicles. It was opened on 23rd March 1889 and there were three ferries Gordon, Duncun and Hutton. The second generation of paddle steamers were Squires and Gordon (again!) built in 1922 and Will Crooks and John Benn built in 1930. By the 1960s the ferry traffic was clogging up Woolwich where the traffic waiting to board the ferry often streached back into the main shopping streets. So three new bigger boats were built in 1963, John Burns, James Newman and (pictured here) Ernist Bevin. They were 'Roll on, Roll off' type boats... Read more

A Day Out to Woolwich

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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During the early years after the Second World War my mother would take me to Woolwich as a special treat. I was about 8 year old then. We would catch the 696 trolleybus from Dartford market and arrive at the Woolwich Arsenal around lunch time. Our first stop was Manzie's Pie and Eel shop - absolutely delicious after the wartime food. From there we would walk past Woolwich Empire on our way to the ferry. On the way we would watch the trams changing their electric shoes and then proceed to the ferry pier. When we boarded I immediately went down to see the steam engines at work. They had polished brass bearing and well-oiled pistions. The smell of steam, coal, and oil still remains with me. Arriving at the other side we would simply walk to the Royal Victoria Gardens (still there) and, after an hour or so return to Woolwich. It doesn't seem much now but after the blitz it was really a great day out.

Over The Water !

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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The Woolwich Ferry was the only way I can remember in the 1950s and 60s that we could go 'over the water ' from South to North London. I can remember trips with my Nannie as a child , catching a bus from Eltham to Woolwich and then on the Ferry when she went to visit a Methodist Church on the other side of the Thames. The Thames at that time was so smelly she used to give me a hankie with lavender water to hold to my nose! I loved going on the ferry and can remember the noise and smell of the engine room and the excitement of landing on the other side. To me it was a journey to another land !  

Never Seen Aunt Fanny by Gaslight !!

Market 1963, Woolwich
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Woolwich Market ..what a hoot ! I can hear the stallkeeper at the far left there now back in 1959...

'ere y'are luv..step right up...step right up..see these 'ere brand new silk bloomers ...never seen dayloit, never seen moonloit and never seen Aunt Fanny by gasloit 'aven't these 'ere bloomers...wot'lyer give me then...three pairs a shilling then...come on nah....

I lived on Mill Lane up by the barracks...used to love wandering around the market on a Saturday, I did.

Woolwich Markets 1940s

Market 1963, Woolwich
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I used to lived in Eltham from 1940 until 1951 - before that it was Plumstead. I visited Woolwich Markets numerous times. My last school was Woolwich Politechnic just a stroll away. I recall eating eel soup at fourpence a bowl in the fish restaurant right on market square. Then there was Dirty Dick's Hotel close by. And of course, the trips on the old paddle-steamer ferries across the Thames, and even the long, long walk along the under-river tunnel... how different it was then. I recall the red sails of the sailing barges, and the tug boats hauling lines of barges. The lines of cranes and ships funnels sticking up all along the docks on the North side of the river. To get to school I'd take a 361 bus, change at the Eltham main street and catch a double-decker tram right into Woolwhich, going past a park, then the playing fields which belong to Woolwich Polly, and the the Royal Artillery Barracks. I left all that behind... Read more

Royal Signals 1954-56 Grand Depot Road

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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Hi there, I wonder if anyone remembers a coffe house in Woolwich - all the solders on demob pinned their shoulder flashes on the wall - it was coverd in them. We were stationed at Connaught Baracks. It was said to be Flo Nightingale place that she trianed her nurses. The Hexagon bulding at the end of Grand Depot Road and Herbert Road was the mortuary. We were no 1 War Office Signal Squadron, any contact welcome, Ken.

Royal Arsenal, Woolwich

Market 1963, Woolwich
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My grandmother worked as a nurse at the Royal Arsenal and was killed by a V1 flying bomb on July 27th 1944; she was in the Taylors shop at the time. 4 killed and 73 wounded. Unfortunately Daisy swopped duty with another that day - fateful day. I am looking for any information about that day or in fact any information or photos of this place. I would be most grateful.

Stewed Eels in Manzies - Circa 1945

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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As a small lad, I loved stewed eels with mash & parsley sauce and occasionally mum would take me to Manzie's in Thomas Street, as it was her favourite too. But on this day we were obliged to share a 'box' with (I should imagine) a Beresford Square stallholder. Poor chap was chilled to the marrow and had a stinking cold and runny nose - sniff, sniff, sniff. But what I particularly remember, was the meticulous placing of the bones around the rim after he had noisily sucked them clean. Looked like a miniature of a jurassic fossil.

I Really Hope Someone Can Help me .

Market 1963, Woolwich
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My mum apparently worked in a cafe in Woolwich during 1955/56, it may have been near the market. I really need to know about all the cafes that were there at that time, who owned them? And does anyone remember the following names from then: Sid (cafe owner. Jeff, who sold things on the market. A man that had one leg, a tall handsome man called John (he may have been of mixed race such as half Cypriot?). Any information, no matter how small, will be very helpful. Thankyou,from Linda

Transportation

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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Used to take a trip across to the other side as a teenager, just for the thrill of seeing the steam engines working. Went on it again a couple of years back to find no foot passengers now.

Progress ?

Common 1962, Woolwich
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From 1958-61 our family was the only one living on Mill Lane, just off the parade grounds near here. My stepfather was 'stationed' with the RAEC at Eltham Palace and I attended Shooter's Hill GS and Westminster Hotel School, subsequently. Our army officer's quarters housing was a quite 'luxurious' rambling one storey structure surrounded by about 4 acres of gardens, a greenhouse and woods where I would first try my hand at gardening, use my air rifle and be subjected to painful, enforced soccer practice !

Now, I can see from 'bird's eye' aerial photographs that the house and adjoining military buildings no longer exist and have been replaced by about 20+ condo type houses. Progress, I suppose !!

Grab A Bargain!

Market 1963, Woolwich
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In the 1950s to the 1970s I can remember Woolwich  Market well. It sold fruit, veg and clothes. There were also the market traders who held auctions with everything from tea sets to toys for sale. Were they a bargain? Who knows, but we had great fun listening to the Cockney patter and taking home our prizes!

Woolwich, Shooters Hill

Common 1962, Woolwich
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From Chris Johnson,
This photograph is of Woolwich Common near General Gordon's House looking towards the Royal Military Accademy on the road towards Eltham. These houses are not there anymore and the 1960's Woolwich Common Estate now stands there and the blue plaque that was on General Gordon's house is now in the Heritage Centre in the old Arsenal.

There And Back

The Ferry 1964, Woolwich
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I remember staying at my Nan and Grandpa's house in Woolwich, we could actually look out of our bedroom window and see the ferries going back and forth. Most times we stayed we were allowed to ride the ferries back and forth sometimes up to 4 or 5 times. It was an experience I will always remember. No-one woried about you then, there was virtually no violence and cases of children going missing and the like were unheard of.
Seeing these pictures again brought back wonderful memories of days gone by that we will never have again, what a shame!

Working in Woolwich

My father's first job was with the RACS in the stables getting the horses ready in the morning to go out pulling the numerous carts. The stables were at the far end of the stores up a sideway. He then became a milkman with them for years until he joined the fire service prior to WW2

The Old Co-Op in Woolwich

Me and My Mum used to go in to the old Co-Op in Woolwich and My brought a mat in there before it closes and there was a post office in there aswell

Ferry

I used to love the ferry, it was like going on holiday. My mum had a brother in hospital somewhere near Woolwich. It was always Sunday and it always seemed to be sunny. I used to love going down and seeing all the working parts on the old ferries, always polished and shinning. It seems daft but I can still smell the Thames, I think it's cleaner now. Sometimes we would walk the tunnel but that scared me, I always thought the water was going to come in. I hear it's not changed much, the tunnel.

Did You Work at The Co-Op or Woolwich Market?

Hi all, I'm doing an oral history project about local industries. I would really like to get in touch with people who worked in Woolwich Market or the Co-op stores. Any ideas much appreciated. The project is called Working Lives of the Thames Gateway: http://www.hidden-histories.org.uk/projects/working-lives-thames-gateway-introduction All the best, Laura

Working in Woolwich

After leaving school my first job was in Cuffs department store on the counter selling scarves and gloves. I was a very shy girl but a lovely lady named Tessa took me under her wing and we became friends. She was older than me and had a really good sense of humour - I often wonder what became of her. My next position was opposite Cuffs working as a window dresser (this is what I had always wanted to do)for Richard Shops, a well known chain of stores selling ladies fashion. There were quite a few of us girls working there and the two I remember most were June Mckay and Jean Loveday. The railway ran behind the premises and in the summer we would sit outside, eat our lunch and wave to passengers - our lunch more often than not would be chips from 'the hole in the wall' - a tiny shop set back in the brickwork of the railway. We used to have such a laugh there,... Read more

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