Belfast, The Ulster Institute For The Deaf, Dumb And Blind 1897

Belfast, The Ulster Institute For The Deaf, Dumb And Blind 1897

Neg. 40202

Memories of Belfast

Growing Up In Gilnahirk

My family moved from Leeds, Yorks to Gilnahirk when I was 11 months old - my parents had a house built in Gilnahirk Walk and we moved in when I was two. I and my two sisters had an idyllic childhood, we had so many ...Read full memory

A memory of Belfast by Isobel Buck

Looking For My Past Maybe You Are A Part Of It

I clicked 1860 because that's as far back as the choices went. Perhaps someone who has deep roots in Belfast might recollect a piece of my story. It begins with the birth of Margaret Jeffrey in ...Read full memory

Coffee |Bar Cowboys

After school - Belfast Royal Academy - a liitle gang of us would take the bus down to Royal Avenue and head for the Lombard restaurant in Lombard Street. It was a very comfortable, spacious place, founded by the Ulster ...Read full memory

A memory of Belfast by John Mc Millan

A Day With My Granny Baird

back in the years 1947 /1950 ,my grand mother and I would spend a day at Hazelwood ,if I recall correctly by the steps they had a little carnival ,then we would make our way to the Floral hall ,which in those days ...Read full memory

A memory of Belfast by James Baird

This photo is available to buy in a range of sizes and styles, including framed and on canvas.

History

This handsome edifice catered for those needing help from all over the province. When it was new in 1845, it was described as being on the new Lisburn Road about a furlong from the turnpike. Its 225ft frontage, along with two wings extending to the rear, shows what could, and had to be done, by charity. At the time there was a substantial income; but the estimated cost was seven times greater, and a further appeal had to be made. The satisfaction of the subscribers was ensured by employing the leading Belfast architect, and clearly he was not restricted in his art. The foundation stone was laid by Lord Donegall, using a silver trowel.

This is an excerpt from Belfast Photographic Memories, by Henry Hall