Heysham, St Patrick's Chapel Ruins, Heysham Head 1888

Heysham, St Patrick's Chapel Ruins, Heysham Head 1888

Neg. 21071

Memories of Heysham

Heysham Towers Holiday Camp

I remember arriving in Morecambe in 1967, with a mate of mine, to work the Summer at Pontin's in Middleton but, due to a clerical error, our job's were no longer open. So, on the way back to Morecambe, (on the bus), ...Read full memory

A memory of Heysham by Pat Hocking

Morecambe Holiday Camp Heysham

I went to Morecambe Holiday Camp in the late 1960s and loved it. Went for the next few years, I think it was because my parents could leave us to our own devices and enjoy themselves and go dancing. I loved the ...Read full memory

My Happiest Workdays At Trimpell Ici Shell Heysham

I worked for Trimpell ICI Shell at their Heysham complex from 1962 until1975 Starting as an apprentice electrician and ending up as a shift engineer.I worked under another memory contributer ...Read full memory

A memory of Heysham by Gordon Higton

Memories Of Heysham

My paternal grandparents, Ernie and Sally Featherstone, lived at 11 Burnsall Avenue, Heysham with their son Jack (my dad) during the 40s and 50s. My maternal grandparents, Sid and Olive Wilson, and their daughters Mavis (my ...Read full memory

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History

St Patrick himself is said to have been shipwrecked on the head; years later, monks came from his monastic foundation in Ireland and built this chapel in his memory. It dates from Saxon times, the 8th century, and one of the reasons it had stood so long in such an exposed spot is the mortar. It is ground-up sea shells, heated and mixed with boiling water to give a cement-like substance. It is the only example left in England of a single- cell Saxon chapel. Our Victorian ladies posing by the chapel add charm to our photograph—which apart from them could have been taken today.