Middlesbrough, The Transporter Bridge 1913

Middlesbrough, The Transporter Bridge 1913

Neg. 66412

Memories of Middlesbrough

Tortolano's Icecream

My name is Christine Jackson (nee Poole). I lived in Middlesbrough, until the age of thirteen, when in 1972, my family migrated to Perth, Western Australia. We lived in Pallister Park until 1968, when we moved into ...Read full memory

“Play Up, Play Up, And Play The Game!”

My memory bank has been activated by the contributed items about Hugh Bell Central School, though my recollections of Hugh Bell are older than those published on this website. My years at Hugh Bell were ...Read full memory

Opening Of Albert Park

My great grandfather, Mark MIDGLEY was a member of the First North Yorks Artillery Volunteers. He was in number four battery for 11 years where he rose to the rank of sergeant-major. I have news paper cuttings of ...Read full memory

Albert Park In The Fifties

Dad used to take us in a rowing boat on the lake. We had to take turns rowing and we were only 4, 5 and 6 years of age. Not sure health and safety would approve now!!! I remember being called in eg "number 2 your time is up". Great memories.

This photo is available to buy in a range of sizes and styles, including framed and on canvas.

History

The building of this extraordinary bridge was discussed in Victoria's reign, but it was not opened until 1901. Pedestrians and vehicles cross by means of a suspended platform which moves to and fro across the Tees. The bridge is often closed when high winds make it dangerous for use.

The building of this extraordinary bridge was discussed in Victoria's reign, but it was not opened until 1901. Pedestrians and vehicles cross by means of a suspended platform which moves to and fro across the Tees. The bridge is often closed when high winds make it dangerous for use.

Before the commissioning of the transporter bridge a ferry operated across the Tees to Port Clarence. The transporter bridge was designed and built by the Cleveland Bridge & Engineering Co and was opened for traffic in 1911. It is the largest of its type in the world, at 850ft long and 215ft high.

This is an excerpt from North Yorkshire Photographic Memories, by Clive Hardy