Newhaven Memories

Read and share memories of Newhaven

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This week's Places

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I too lived in Evelyn Ave at No51 my Grandparents house. Also I was born in Evelyn Ave in the midwifes house. After 74 yrs I am unable to remember the number (in the 40s I think). I went to school at Meeching Primary. David Jones

My name was Susan Penfold and I grew up in a small house on Evelyn Avenue in Newhaven. My mother's mother was one of seventeen children born in Piddinghoe. I used to visit my grandmother's home and aunt Tops, auntie Else and uncle Pearce were kind to me. As a child they would give me home made cake and parsnip wine. I loved the (...Read full memory)

Pinner Grammar School had an exchange programme for students in Annecy and every year a party of 4th and 5th Forners travelled to France on the Newhaven to Dieppe Ferry. When I was in the fourth form I joined the school party which was very exciting as I had never previously travelled abroad. We sailed (...Read full memory)

The year England won the World Cup (1966) I was 8 years old and living on the coastguard station at Newhaven with my younger brother, you could hear my late father yell as England lifted the World Cup, we beat West Germany. Other than that it was always lots of fun, from where we were we could clearly see the lifeboat house and the car ferries come and go.

I used to live in Court Farm Road. My friends' parents used to own the caravan park, my friends' names were Pat, Alan and another sister, their cousin Susan lived next door to me. I remember the neighbours going out with the Lifeboat when the cannon went off. I used to go to the big school on the hill, I think it was (...Read full memory)

My parents used to camp there before the Second World War, they used to go most weekends. My first memories of Newhaven were of camping after the war I was five. We used go most weekends. My father built his first caravan in the attic in our London flat then reassembled it on the site, we used it for (...Read full memory)

It must have been in the late 1960s, I was on duty in the old watch house and, as was my habit, I was hooking out whiting out of the Harbour. Fish that at the time had no commercial value at market, and the fishermen threw them back in. I was so engrossed in my angling when a voice behind said "What's all this then, (...Read full memory)

I was a partially deaf pupil at Ovingdean during the 1970s and as my home was a long way from there, I was one of the very few pupils that resided at the school during the weekends. I do remember two very profound memories of Newhaven during my four years at the school and although we often used to visit, (...Read full memory)

My father's aunt and uncle lived in Newhaven. Ted Hoskins was his uncle's name, he was injured in the First World War and later worked at the lighthouse at the end of the breakwater before it was automated. His wife's name was May Jane.  After the Second World War I went with my parents many times to Newhaven for (...Read full memory)

The small sandy beach at Newhaven was known as the horse shoe bite. It was completely covered at high tide, but as the water receded, it exposed fine golden sand, ideal for making castles and getting in your sandwiches. A row of barnacle-peppered rocks along the breakwater wall also got revealed with the falling tide, (...Read full memory)