Featured Memories

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This week's Places

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Reconnecting with our shared local history.

Enjoy these selected memories that have amused or fascinated our team - we think you will enjoy them!

This goes back a long way, I think around 1950. I was a pupil at King's School in Rochester and used to live just off Brompton Farm Road. My parents used to allow me to sleep in the garden (an adventure ?), I digress, I used to go around on my bike, and one day cycling down Crutches Lane, I noticed some (...Read full memory)

My name is Alan Moore and I was born at No.7 Church Street on the 18th December 1944. Apart from 12 years I spent down Bolton on Dearne, I have lived all my life in Thurnscoe, and that I am proud of. I was a Co-op milkman for twelve years in Thurnscoe and Goldthorpe, and then the Co-op Insurance Agent for (...Read full memory)

I have the fondest memories of Caister on Sea. We used to have a week there every year and my sister and I were the only kids in our street that had a holiday every year. Like most people in the East End of London, we had very little money, but my dad worked on the railway and got travel concessions (...Read full memory)

'Cash on the Nail' the man said. . . and a century or so ago in Bristol he really meant it. For the deal would have been clinched on one of Bristol's four famous nails standing outside the Corn Exchange on Corn Street or, from the late 1550s to 1771, under a covered walk outside All Saints Church before they were (...Read full memory)

I was born on the 24th of July 1929 above a shop next to a pub called the Rose of Denmark, in Hotwells, Bristol, very convenient for Father to wet his whistle and my head at the same time. Father was born in 1893, Mother in 1895. They were married on the 9th August 1924. My older brother John was born in 1927. Two months (...Read full memory)

I was born in Farnborough Hospital during February of 1940. My home for the next 7 years was at 9 Kennelworth Road, and then we moved to 263 Crescent Drive, where I spent the next thirteen years. My recollections of the war are very sketchy, but I will try to give some insight on how people, (...Read full memory)

As a boy of thirteen, with my family, after the war, I spent all my school holidays in Cornwall. Six weeks with my Uncle Arthur and Aunt Mabel in a tied cottage on Lower Tregantle Farm near Torpoint. The very air was different; how many times since those days has a certain fresh breeze and smell conjured up (...Read full memory)

The St. John Ambulance Brigade of Grays Thurrock had three wooden first aid posts that they manned over bank holidays and summer weekends which were along what was the main road from East End of London running through to Southend-on-Sea. They were painted white and when manned and flew the brigade (...Read full memory)

Each year, the excitement mounted as summer drew near. Dad would drag out the large wicker hamper and Mum would start to fill it with clothes, wellies and tins of food from Galbraiths or the Co-op. By school's end, the carriers would have come to cart the hamper down the tenement stairs and onto its journey. We'd (...Read full memory)

I am Jeannette McNicol (nee Elliott). My brother John and I moved there with my parents ,when I was 13 years old and he was 12. I had found the house when we were having a picnic by the Webbern with friends. I had gone skipping off down the lane, and seen the house (...Read full memory)

Our family moved to Friars Road in the summer of 66, from a damp house in Boothen Green, which looked over toward the Michelin Factory. I was 5 years old. My father Graham was a former art student at Burslem College of Art under the painter, poet and playwrite Arthur Berry, and by the 70’s became a tv engineer. Mother (...Read full memory)

I was born in 1938 and my maternal grandparents lived in a tiny shop on Havant Road, Cosham. I remember I used to write to them occasionally which is how I remember the address. I can't ,though, recall the number. Their name was Owen. I know that when my mother and I travelled on the No. 31 bus from Fishbourne (...Read full memory)

When I was around 11 years old in the early '60s we used to go to Chapel every year and stayed in Standish Bungalow. It was owned by my mother's employer who allowed us to go there as a reward for her devoted service. Lovely bungalow and so full of character and very secluded. I recall one (...Read full memory)

As a child and adult, I remember the bridge and how long it was closed for boats coming up to the BOCM and Ranks flour mill. It had to opened in sync with the railway bridge and the trains. I remember the barges with big red sails towing more barges, and the year of a severe freeze when the river froze solid (...Read full memory)

In 1961, I became an apprentice furrier to Brainin Bothers of New Bond Street. Brainin's owned a large store (I was told it was as big as Harrods) in Russia.They escaped the Communists and moved to Vienna, only to escape Hitler in 1938. Max and Leo were the brothers and Nat Saunders was the Master Furrier. Every monday we (...Read full memory)

My name is Andy Pike, getting on a bit now but lovely to read other folks memories of Westbury. Here are a few reminiscences of my childhood in Westbury on Trym in the 50's and 60's. Maybe this will ring a few bells for ex, or present, residents of Westbury that are of my generation. I was born (...Read full memory)

When I lived in Wokingham in the 1950s, I remember a double fronted cycle shop on Denmark Street (next door to the entrance to some sort of meeting hall?) - you can just see part of the hanging sign for the shop in picture number W123016. To me then the shop seemed quite large and was certainly stuffed full (...Read full memory)

The Army My call up papers came with a railway warrant for Gloucester, where I and another group of lucky lads, were picked up by army lorry and taken to the barracks of the Gloucester Regiment for our six weeks basic training. Unloaded at the barrack square, we were marched (shambled) to our huts, then to the QM stores for (...Read full memory)

I first lived in a little cottage in Jolly Sailors Yard, around 1944. When I was about 3 years old my parents, Fred and Connie Smith, my brother Derek and me, Norman (Bim) Smith moved to Standard House. We had a great lIfe living there when we were older, just walking round the corner and diving off (...Read full memory)

We moved from New Cross, Deptford just before the war to The Heights Northolt. As a child then, memories are now somewhat fragmented but that reflects the conditions that parents faced. As a child there seemed much freedom, school was intermittent, lots of time, putting pennies onto the rails of the (...Read full memory)

I lived in Oakwood, then Enfield West, from 1937 till 1946. My father had the Chemists Shop in the Parade, his name was George Reid, and we lived above the shop. Opposite was Victor Sasoon’s Estate, where I think Prisoner of War Officers were imprisoned, during the War. Also in the Parade was a greengrocer, with a (...Read full memory)

This scene of Queens Road brings back many many memories for me. First of all, when very young and at the early months of WW2, probably in the late Autumn with falling light in the after school hours. Somehow I had come across or discovered the quite elegant shops there all on one side that one would frequent when being taken (...Read full memory)

The Transport Department at Southmead Hospital when I joined them consisted of an officer, foreman, and four porter drivers, with two buses, three vans, and two cars. We were responsible for supplying the group hospitals with staff, goods, and laundry. The group was comprised of nine (...Read full memory)

In the late 1950’s and as a young boy around 8 or 9 living in the west end of Newcastle I used to visit my Auntie Bella and Uncle Ted regularly . They lived at Number 3 Picktree Cottages, a short row of picturesque cottages now demolished and replaced with the bungalows on Picktree Lane situated almost opposite (...Read full memory)

Your Mam Margaret has been trying to find you for years and years and never has and never will stop thinking about and loving you. It was not your Mams wishes for you to be adopted you were taken away solely because she was unmarried. If any of the above (...Read full memory)

At the ripe old age of 89 years I well remember my years at what I have always regarded as "Home.". In 1931 I first entered the world, living in Wembley, but in 1935 I recall my father meeting Harry Peachey of Belton Estates and arranging to purchase a yet-to-be built semi-detached (...Read full memory)

A pleasant comment on my last memory, made by Mr Steve Flora, whom I’ve never met, has prompted me to tell some more stories about Upper Boddington. On November 25th, 1944, a Wellington Bomber; no. LN242, took off from Chipping Warden airfield. Unfortunately it developed engine problems. I am sure that the (...Read full memory)

Just thought many might remember waking up on Boxing Day 1963 and seeing snow on the ground which looked lovely. However, most of us will remember that said snow was around until about March 1964 and we had a live Christmas Tree in its tub in the dining room until April 1964 when it (...Read full memory)

I Join the Railway In the summer of 1953, my Aunt and Uncle were staying with us for their holiday. It must have been my Uncle who first spotted the advertisement in the Dartmouth Chronicle for a Junior Booking Clerk at Kingswear Station. Everyone knew I was not fond of (...Read full memory)

I lived in Wood End Lane (no. 9), from 1941 from the age of six months, until 1948 when I moved to the new council houses at Newnham Close, locally known as Tintown, because it had steel framed walls on the upper storey. No. 9 was a ground- floor flat with two bedrooms and my sister Joyce and I shared the back bedroom. After (...Read full memory)

I left Ireland with my Family in 1953 and left part of my heart there. My Grandparents lived in Portavogie right by the seaside, they had a farm and a General store. Granny always had a pot of soup on her stove in the winter, and many people would have a bowl of soup to warm them. She always said, "always put an extra potato in (...Read full memory)

In a previous memory of mine I mentioned that the village of Upper Boddington was without mains water in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s . I lived in the School House with my parents, Pat and George Bishop. My mother became Headmistress in November 1949 and the lack of water on tap was just one of (...Read full memory)

I played in the standing corn stooks behind our house, had my first pony/horse ride at Dixon's farm where my horse went berserk in a potato field, so I was put onto and stayed on a horse lead. I flew my kites on Penn Common, I skated on frozen ponds (No skates - I couldn't afford them) in the (...Read full memory)

I think it must have been 1952 or 3 when I went to live on Kingwood Common with my parents in the old nissen huts left by the German POWs, and afterwards by Polish refugees. We knew the place as Kingdom Camp, or just 'The Camp'. There were a good few families living there that I remember and they formed a (...Read full memory)

I was born in Battersea in 1938. We lived at 28 Forthbridge Rd near Clapham Common. With my mum and sister, I went to the Granada cinema loads of times on a Saturday night. Often you had to line up to get in and they had these men dressed up in uniforms, even with 3 stripes or 2 on their arms, who used to (...Read full memory)

I hope you will indulge me a little as this memory is not mine but my late mother's. In 1953 my mum was 13 years old. Her name was Eleanor Williamson and she was admitted to Shotley Bridge Hospital into the care of Dr C E M Kellett. She was suffering with Septicemia and was barely clinging to life. (...Read full memory)

I lived as a child at number 110 henwood lane Catherine de barnes or better known as catney.The house we lived in was the lodge to the hospital. I lived with mother and father,4 sisters and 3 brothers. We spent 3 years there from 1962 untill1965.in 1962 I remember my dad and I going into the woods and looking (...Read full memory)

The Fish Meadow is just North and East of the river bridge, and in my youth, (as now) was prone to flooding. I remember a year when the still water, stretching across the meadow (as opposed to the main river flow) froze over. Then, while the temperature remained below freezing, the water subsided, allowing the ice (...Read full memory)

I lived in the valley until the very early 60's and can remember Christmas very well. As a treat I was taken to Lewises in Manchester to meet Father Christmas. I can recall queuing up some stairs to visit his Grotto. Christmas parties at Hareholme Methodist Church. Making decorations at school for the class (...Read full memory)

I was born in Moorland Crescent in the 1950’s. This council housing estate was built a few decades earlier and has a variety of different style good quality houses. Most people had nice gardens with flowers etc and we had vegetables and fruit bushes in the back garden. On summer nights it was not (...Read full memory)