Coronavirus: Thank you for your continued support in these difficult times. Since our office and factory are in a rural area, our staff travel to work individually by car and we have enough space to maintain social distancing, so in consultation with our staff, we have decided to remain open for business unless government policy changes.
We are still able to despatch most of our products, however, the ones listed below (that are made by other manufacturers) will not be available for a while.

Tableware (Coasters & Placemats) and Wallpaper.

Our despatch times are normal, but Royal Mail & Parcelforce delivery times are varying depending on location - some parcels arrive next day and others are taking up to 10 days, which we have no control over.

We will update this message as anything changes.

Featured Memories

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Add a Memory!

It's easy to add your own memories and reconnect with your shared local history. Search for your favourite places and look for the Add Your Memory links to begin.

Tips & Ideas

Not sure what to write? It's easy - just think of an important place in your life and ask yourself:

  • How does it feature in your personal history?
  • What are your best memories of this place?
  • How has it changed over the years?
  • How does it feel, seeing these places again?
  • Do you remember stories about the community, its history and people?

This week's Places

Here are some of the places people are talking about in our Share Your Memories community this week:

...and hundreds more! Enjoy browsing more recent contributions now.

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Reconnecting with our shared local history.

Enjoy these selected memories that have amused or fascinated our team - we think you will enjoy them!

I have the fondest memories of Caister on Sea. We used to have a week there every year and my sister and I were the only kids in our street that had a holiday every year. Like most people in the East End of London, we had very little money, but my dad worked on the railway and got travel concessions (...Read full memory)

As a child and adult, I remember the bridge and how long it was closed for boats coming up to the BOCM and Ranks flour mill. It had to opened in sync with the railway bridge and the trains. I remember the barges with big red sails towing more barges, and the year of a severe freeze when the river froze solid (...Read full memory)

I first lived in a little cottage in Jolly Sailors Yard, around 1944. When I was about 3 years old my parents, Fred and Connie Smith, my brother Derek and me, Norman (Bim) Smith moved to Standard House. We had a great lIfe living there when we were older, just walking round the corner and diving off (...Read full memory)

My first job after leaving school in 1968 was at the original Frith & Co. in Raglan Road, Reigate. The company was based in a large Victorian mansion and in many ways the working methods probably hadn't changed much since the early 1950s. The nostalgia market was in its infancy in 1968 and the company (...Read full memory)

I 'lived' in Clarence Park for years when I was a kid. It became my magic Kingdom! I knew every bush and tree and secret trail through the bushes. I would lurk in the bushes and spy on people walking past. I had a favourite tree - a huge beech next to the bowling green. I would climb high in it and sit quietly (...Read full memory)

In 1932 my father Len James was moved to Brockenhurst as the 'village bobby'. I was born in 1931 and my brother in 1929. We lived in the Police house (now a renovated private home) and eventually both us boys went to the C of E Primary School. Dad had a standard issue police bicycle, on which he would ride to (...Read full memory)

The gas lamps in Station Road, Kilbirnie, were the responsibility of staff on duty at the High Station. This line went right through to Glasgow Central Station and of course it was the age of steam. Sanny Dillon was the lamp lighter and being small he carried with him a large pole with a hook on it. (...Read full memory)

We were raised in a pit house on Springfield (sometimes 'Avenue') near the far end of Ings Lane, in the fifties. It was a small street, only 6 houses. 2 or 3 keys would open both front and back doors (and the coal-house) of the whole street; but you hardly ever locked the door anyway. Often our (...Read full memory)

I Join the Railway In the summer of 1953, my Aunt and Uncle were staying with us for their holiday. It must have been my Uncle who first spotted the advertisement in the Dartmouth Chronicle for a Junior Booking Clerk at Kingswear Station. Everyone knew I was not fond of (...Read full memory)

As you look at this picture, the hedgerow and trees on the right hid an old spring water bottling plant. It was all very basic. We discovered it one day on a trip to One Tree Hill. As a 'gang' of boys from Goldsmiths Avenue, we used to wander all over the place exploring and tree climbing. We had a tree along the (...Read full memory)

Tank tops and bell bottoms-memoirs of a Birkenhead lad I was born in Birkenhead in 1954 at the back of Central Station, opposite the Haymarket, and still remember being hungry all the time. We were poor, as was everyone we knew. A Catholic family, no birth control, the more kids you had the more Catholics (...Read full memory)

When I was around 11 years old in the early '60s we used to go to Chapel every year and stayed in Standish Bungalow. It was owned by my mother's employer who allowed us to go there as a reward for her devoted service. Lovely bungalow and so full of character and very secluded. I recall one (...Read full memory)

I was born at 7, Nightingale Row, in the box room which was originally shared by my mother Mavis Warren and her sister Glennis Byard as they were to become. The daughters of George and Martha (Dot) Edwards. The house was rented from a relative who lived in number 8, whose name was Bexley. The two daughters married RAF (...Read full memory)

First stayed there in 1951. My dad rented the chalet opposite the green corrugated Chapel aside of the sandy path which lead to the beach. Apart from the shop and chippy there was a Welcoast ice cream kiosk on the corner that closed a couple of years later.'(Often licked never beaten' was the slogan) The shop was run as (...Read full memory)

When I lived in Wokingham in the 1950s, I remember a double fronted cycle shop on Denmark Street (next door to the entrance to some sort of meeting hall?). To me then the shop seemed quite large and was certainly stuffed full of bikes and accessories that I coveted. I can still remember the wood flooring (...Read full memory)

My earliest memories are of Aldringham. I was born in the Police Station on Mill Hill in 1937, the youngest of three children. My father was the local policeman, P.C. James McGuire. I often wonder now how my mother managed, with three children under five. There was no water electricity, gas or sewage. Water had to be (...Read full memory)

I remember Mr. Beecham, a lovely teacher who took us for science - but look out if you misbehaved. I would watch fearfully as he dished out punishment. He would take you into a little side room he called his 'cupboard' and tan your behind with a big white plimsole. One day I was caught messing around and it was my turn for (...Read full memory)

No stranger to Friday bath night (did we really only bathe once a week?), where the tin bath was hauled into the kitchen in summer & in front of the fire in winter & filled by kettle. As I got older my dad would take me down to the public wash baths where I could luxuriate in a 'real bath' in a real bathroom. My dad (...Read full memory)

Soon after I began motorcycling in the mid fifties I began to take what has been a lifelong interest in motorcycle racing. In those days it was a good trek to Brands Hatch as there were no M1 or M25 motorways and the journey from Bedfordshire was made through the center of London taking in Euston, Blackfriars (...Read full memory)

In the post war years, as families rebuilt their lives again, Sundays really were special leisure days and those who were able, bought a small car and enjoyed their afternoon going for rides on quiet country roads. My father was a self employed carpenter and joiner and needed transport but, as (...Read full memory)

The Cabin in Graham Road was a school boy's (and girl's) dream! At the front of the shop, behind the counter, was an array of jars of sweets, sold by the quarter (lb) and every other piece of confectionary or chocolate you could name: Black Jacks, Fruit Salad, Shrimps, Flying Saucers, Sherbert Fountains, Palm Toffee (banana (...Read full memory)

My memories of Cefn Fforest were of Whitson marches in your new clothes and having sore feet where your new sandles rubbed your feet raw. Along with 'Thomas The Milk' was Pughs Farm who had a horse and cart delivering the milk - my parents would send me out to collect the milk in a jug - this was before the milk (...Read full memory)

My Name is William Speirs, in the 1940's we moved from Bellshill Lanarkshire to live in Fishcross, Alloa, Clackmananshire, Scotland. This is a short story about when we were kids in Fishcross from about 1946 till I left in 1959. The people I played with, my schools, Fishcross, Sauchie, then Fore brae’s at the (...Read full memory)