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Woodhouse Eves - a Memory of Woodhouse Eaves.

My name is Jacqueline Billingsley. I was sent here in the 1950's from hospital due to kidney problems. I remember the Matron who would take her small dog for walks every morning in the woods. Being very fond of dogs even at a young age but the Matron would never let any of us pet or even play with her dog. I had a best friend there called Pat whom I recall had been burnt over most of her body. Visiting day was Sunday. My parents lived in Birmingham and coming from a large family they could not afford to visit me every week. Pat's parents took pity on me so used to bring treats in the form of sweets and peaches. I remember been given malt on a daily basis yuk. On warm sunny days we would be taken into the woods to take naps on camping beds. None of us wanted to nap we wanted to play. All the girls wore the same dresses which were left at the end of our beds each morning. I recall nurses giving us games but I don't remember them being child-friendly and we were all scared of the Matron including the nurses I think. I do recall one small boy who spent most of his time in bed and when allowed I would go and chat with him. I was about 5/6 yrs old and I remember mostly missing my home and had it not been for Pat I would have been a very lonely unhappy girl. Every morning I would wake up hoping to find my own clothes on the bed which was the sign you were going home. To me the home was a huge and forbidding place and always seemed dark inside. Woe betide any child that didn't eat their food which I recall as not being very nice at all. Easy I guess as an adult to feel that non-one seemed to care - I'm sure they did but one has to remember that sickly children are treated much better these days. This was the 50's and the child rearing /care was symbolic of the times. I've never forgotten Pat (Patricia).


A memory shared by jacbill15 on Aug 12th, 2017.
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